Level 4 Number

Level 4 Maths

As parents, you will wish to know how your child is getting on in maths, and some of you may wish to support your child with extra practice at home. This handout shows some of the key skills for level 4 in the strands of ‘Number’ and ‘Using and Applying’, along with examples of questions your child may be expected to answer. You could discuss the questions with your child at home, and help them to understand and practise similar questions in any areas where they have difficulty. However, we would stress the following points:

  • This is only a sample of the skills children need to develop. Even these skills will be applied in a wider range of contexts.
  • Children develop at different speeds. Making steady progress is more important than achieving a particular level by a certain age.
  • We want children to enjoy maths! Practising regularly for short periods may be better than one long session! Maths skills can be developed through games, or involvement in real life situations (e.g. shopping).

Skills

Examples of how the skill may be assessed

Answers/Tips

I can recognise and describe number patterns.

 

Fill in the missing numbers in this sequence.

__,  2.1,  2.3,  2.5,  2.7,  __,  __

 

How did you work it out?

 

If you continue, will 22.4 be in the sequence? How do you know?

 

Here is a sequence where every number is double the previous number. What are the missing numbers?

__,  __,  6,  12,  24,  48,  __

 

1.9,  2.1,  2.3,  2.5,  2.7,  2.93.1

 

Encourage your child to describe how they know by discussing the rule for the sequence (e.g. This sequence increases in steps of 0.2). They can also notice patterns such as the tenths digit always being odd, which means that 22.4 will not be in the sequence.

 

1.53,  6,  12,  24,  48,  96

I can recognise and describe number relationships including multiple, factor and square.

 

Here are 4 digits.

3     6     1     5

Can you use them to make the following 2 digit numbers?

 

A multiple of 7

 

A square number

 

A factor of 32

Possible answers could be:

A multiple of 7:   35, 56 or 63

A square number:   16 or 36

A factor of 32:   16

Children may find it helpful to make lists of, for example, the multiples of 7, to help them see the possibilities. They should be encouraged to describe how they recognised the answers.

I can use place value to multiply and divide whole numbers by 10 or 100.

 

1. Write in the missing numbers:

2700 ÷ 100 = □

340 = □ x 10

 

2. Write what the missing digits could be:

□□□ ÷ 10 = 4□

1.     2700 ÷ 100 = 27

340 = 34 x 10

 

2. There are several possible answers, e.g.

400 ÷ 10 = 40

410 ÷ 10 = 41

I can recognise approximate proportions of a whole and use simple fractions and percentages to describe these.

 

 

Shade 10% of this grid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10% of the grid can be worked out by finding 1/10 of the grid, or 20 ÷ 10. Therefore two parts should be shaded.

I can order decimals to three decimal places.

 

Order these decimals from smallest to largest.

2.134   2.119   1.897   2.008   2.576

1.897   2.008   2.119   2.134   2.576

Encourage your child to look at the most significant digits first, ie. Units, then tenths, then hundredths etc

I can use inverse operations.

 

Use a calculator to find the missing number.

23.6 x □ = 295

 

Find the missing number.

16 + □ = 100 ÷ 5

23.6 x 12.5 = 295

 

This can be found by using the inverse operation, 295 ÷ 23.6

 

16 + 4 = 100 ÷ 5

I can use a range of mental methods of computation with all operations.

 

Quickly work out complements to 1000, e.g. 887 + □ = 1000

 

 Mentally work out calculations such as:

0.4 x 8

3.6 ÷ 6

6 – 0.25

The numbers in these calculations are carefully chosen so as to be easy to work with mentally.

e.g.

If you know 4 x 8 = 32 it may be easy to work out that 0.4 x 8 = 3.2

 

36 ÷ 6 = 6, and so 3.6 ÷ 6 = 0.6

I can recall multiplication facts up to 10 x 10 and quickly derive corresponding division facts.

 

Use the knowledge of these tables facts and place value to solve calculations with multiples of 10, such as:

40 x 7

50 x 4

120 ÷ 3

270 ÷ 9

4 x 7 = 28, so 40 x 7 = 280

 

5 x 4 = 20, so 50 x 4 = 200

 

12 ÷ 3 = 4, so 120 ÷ 3 = 40

 

27 ÷ 9 = 3, so 270 ÷ 9 = 30

I can use efficient methods of addition and subtraction and of multiplication and division.

 

 

1203 + 55 + 367

 

1025 – 345

 

For information about calculation methods, do an internet search for ‘MathsWeb’. Then navigate via ‘Primary Teachers’ to the Leicestershire Calculation Policy.

Look at the policy for Years 5 and 6. MathsWeb also has a ‘Parents’ section with other helpful advice.

I can multiply a simple decimal by a single digit.

 

35.6 x 8

 

x

30

5

0.6

8

240

40

4.8

 

Then mentally add,

240 + 40 + 4.8 = 284.8