Level 3 Number

Level 3 Maths

As parents, you will wish to know how your child is getting on in maths, and some of you may wish to support your child with extra practise at home. This handout shows some of the key assessment criteria for level 3 in the area of ‘number’, along with examples of questions your child may be expected to answer in this area. You could discuss the questions with your child at home, and help them to understand and practise similar questions in any areas where they have difficulty. However, we would stress the following points:

  • Children develop at different speeds. Making steady progress is more important than achieving a particular level by a certain age.
  • This is only a sample of the skills children are assessed on.

We want children to enjoy maths! Practising regularly for short periods may be better than one long session! Often maths skills can be developed effectively through games, or involvement in real life situations like shopping.

Skill

Examples of how the skill may be assessed

Answers/Tips

I understand the place value of digits in numbers to 1000.

Fill in the missing numbers:

200 + __ + 7 = 267

488 = __ + 80 + 8

 

How many tens are there in 530?

200 + 60 + 7 = 267

488 = 400 + 80 + 8

 

There are 53 tens in 530.

I can order decimals with one decimal place.

Put these decimal numbers in order, starting with the smallest:

3.8    1.8    1.4    0.9    4.7

 

0.9    1.4    1.8    3.8    4.7

I can compare numbers to 1000 e.g. < less than, > greater than

Use the correct symbol in each place: < , > or =

343 __ 434

980 __ 899

50 + 60 __ 110

3 x 99 __ 250

 

343 < 434

980 > 899

50 + 60 = 110

3 x 99 > 250

I can add and subtract two-digit numbers mentally

45 + 34 =

56 + 27 =

93 – 88 =

68 – 21 =

 

Children should use the most appropriate mental strategy. For example, for 93 – 88 they may add on to find the difference, as the numbers are close together. For 68 – 21 it is more appropriate to subtract 20 and then 1.

I can add and subtract three digit numbers using written methods

435 + 482

435   

482    

  7

110

800

917

 

I know the multiplication facts and use them to work out division facts.

Learn the 2x, 3x, 4x, 5x and 10x tables.

 

What is 32 divided by 4

I know that 4 x 8 = 32, so I also know that 32 divided by 4 is 8.

I can find missing whole numbers using inverses.

Fill in the missing numbers:

__ - 2 = 6

9 = 36 - __

3 x __ = 21

 

Matthew is thinking of a number. He divides it by 10 and gets 7. What was his number?

 

If I multiply a number by 4 and then divide the answer by 4, what happens?

 

12 – 2 = 6

9 = 36 – 4

3 x 7 = 21

 

Matthew was thinking of 70.

I can solve whole number multiplication and division problems.

One length of the swimming pool is 25 metres.
Jane swims 5 lengths of the pool.
How far does Jane swim altogether?

Paul swims 225 metres in the pool.
How many lengths does he swim?

(Adapted from Primary Framework for Maths)

Encourage discussion about how the problems could be solved. Does it help to draw a picture or use a blank number line?

e.g.

 

 

Draw own jumps before copying

I can solve whole number division problems involving remainders, rounding up or down depending on the context.

Mr Bloggs the baker packs cakes in boxes of 4. He bakes 35 cakes. How many boxes can he fill? Or, how many boxes does he need to pack all the cakes?

Notice that the answer is 8 boxes or 9 boxes, depending on which question you are answering. This rounding up or down depending on the context is a skill children need to develop.

I can continue whole number sequences forwards or backwards.

Fill in the gaps in these sequences.

3, 6, 9, 12, __, __,

202, 192, 182, 172, __, __,

__, 9, 14, 19, 24, 29, 34, __, __

 

3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18

202, 192, 182, 172, 162, 152

4, 9, 14, 19, 24, 29, 34, 39, 44